Running


#61

Mayo woman Sinead Diver has won the Melbourne Marathon in a record time 2hrs 25,19, she is 41 and only too up running 8 years ago, some achievement, but don’t like being negative, bit it is a little suspicious.


#62

Yeah, she’s in the wrong sport.


#63

Alright Ewan?


#64

:rofl::rofl: Ah she runs for Australia, a deffo cheat:)


#65

Out of interest what will people be taking during marathon gels, natural stuff, nothing etc?


#66

I’ll be on the gels, planning on taking 4, at the 8, 16, 24 & 32k Mark.

But if things go badly I’ll take whatever else I can get my hands on.


#67

Gel before. Then at 6/7, 12/13, 21/22 and one in reserve.

Must check where the water stations are so I can space between gels, also have some dextro chews. Have to admit it’s great to get a few jellies from the kids towards the end


#68

Why the gel before? Always read they were only for when your sugar was running low, usually after around the hour mark.


#69

It’s a tip I was given my physio who is also a runner so it’s part of my superstitions now


#70

Doing a half Marathon tomorrow, will try one at 10k


#71

I got the same tip from an experienced ultra runner. He also said there is no point taking anything after 20m as the system shuts down.


#72

Make sure you trial out any gels / supplements beforehand. I remember taking a gel that they were giving out before a marathon in Belfast once. Can’t be sure that it was the cause, but I got a dose of the shits half way round and it was the most painful / uncomfortable 10 miles I ever ran in my life to finish it!!! I always put it down to that gel I had at the start.


#73

Yeah, I know, the half Marathon tomorrow, although it is a race I am using it with a view to do a better time in a half Marathon next month so it is a bit of a training run.


#74

Well took the gel, did it work ? I dont know but there were no ill effects, last 5k were my fastest and did the time on the plan so now lets see if I get under 1hr 50 next month , today did 1hr 53.53 fairly comfortable


#75

Some of these things are more placebo than actual effect but in my view I don’t care and would try anything to get to my goal


#76

If you have a plan for taking gels … write it down either on your arm or on a piece of paper and keep it handy … same with your pacing etc…

It’s easy to remember now all the miles you plan to take them, but try doing simple maths after 12, 15 or 18 miles in the legs and it’s a different story. Your brain genuinely shuts down parts of itself to conserve energy.

Also, if you have a plan stick to it even if you are due to take one at mile 8, 10 or whatever and feel ok, take it… because the gels are no good to you if you suddenly bottom out… they take about 30 mins to kick in so help prevent you bottoming out…. Whatever you’ve practiced in training, do exactly that on the big day…


#77

Gels take 30 mins to kick in? Granted, I’m not a runner, but I’ve done some pretty big cycles. 120 miles last year and used gels. They kicked in after about 5 mins for me. And no, I don’t have a fast metabolism! My gut will point to that!


#78

Think it depends on the gel and the person


#79

That was what was told to me by an Ultra Marathon runner who was giving us a workshop before I ran the marathon. She’d done over 100 marathons…

It is basically used to keep your glycogen stores topped up but once they empty the gels won’t be enough to replenish them properly.

This probably explains it more scientifically than I can:

Because carbohydrates are stored in both the muscles and the liver and your performance on race day relies on using the glycogen stored in the muscle.

For glycogen to make its way to the muscles, it must first be digested, make it’s way through the intestinal wall, and then absorbed by the muscles.

This process takes time and isn’t very efficient.

However, gels will often “wake you up” in a very noticeable way because our brain only runs on the glucose stored in the liver.

As the muscles start to absorb more blood glucose, the brain gets less glucose and starts to get hazy (you’ve probably noticed this feeling on your long runs or if you ran without eating enough).

Often, a gel will wake you up and help the mind feel energized, but it doesn’t necessarily prevent the bonk in your leg muscles.

What’s the bottom line?
Energy gels help replenish the glycogen and calories you’re burning when racing hard.


#80

On the waves for marathon does anyone know is it possible to switch on the day? Am in Wave 4 but would hope to run in 4 hours.