NFL1 Final, Dublin v Galway, Croke Park, April 1st, 4pm


#746

I can’t understand the call for a second referee on the pitch to help referee games, it would be a total departure from what is currently the norm and would be seen as a sesmic change by those involved in running our games.
Would it not make more sense to simply involve the two linesmen (both referees) in the actual officiating of the game by allowing them to be proactive in informing the ref of incidents as they happen rather than waiting for breaks in play to report what had happened. I know it would also be a new approach but players are already used to linesmen giving imput in games, so it wouldn’t be a complete culture change for them. (or us).


#747

Aussie Rules has three refs. Works fine. Bigger pitch so we’d only need two but I cannot see how it’s not worth trying.


#748

Mic them up , sorted .


#749

my point exactly.


#750

They are!!!


#751

They’ve fooking useless then !


#752

But as things stand they don’t have the authority to make calls during play, only to inform the ref after the event. My view is that they could be actively involved in officiating on the game instead of just observing.


#753

And you get two refs to give out about for the price of one!
Seriously I think it would lead to even more controversy because you’ll have different slants on the rules either side of the half way line. For example, Kevin McLoughlins point after cantering for thirteen steps will be allowed for Mayo and our Kevin Macs goal after 7 steps will be disallowed at the other end during the same game. Cue bedlam!


#754

As I said. It works in Aussie Rules. If the refs can be taught to apply the rules consistently then it would work here too. The one difference seems to be that in Oz refs that aren’t performing to the standard are dispatched very quickly. That would be key.

They also have umpires and linesmen and they work very well together as a team. It an be done it the will is there.


#755

Plus they get well paid for their efforts!!!


#757

I can never tell the difference between sarcasm and irony. I think this is the first one …


#758

I watched the game back there and I find myself bemused as to how we described it as a scrappy, niggly negative game at all. It was actually a really fine, tough, physical contest with some great patches of play and some fabulous hard fought for scores. Both teams will have taken alot from it.


#759

If there had been a second referee the last time Meath won Leinster, would we have gotten clarity on whether or not the ball was grounded for the match-winning try?


#760

Not sure if you’re being sarcy…but i thought the same.

If I was a Dublin fan I’d have been glad of the test.

Man sent off, player off injured and Galway ravenous.

As I said on the day…no amount of training sessions or easy wins could buy that work out.


#761

You’d need a big car boot in Wicklow?


#762

Wasn’t being sarcy. I got caught up in the ranting of other people after, and it doesn’t change anything that I previously said about off-the-ball stuff. I’m only talking about the game itself.

Galway did really well in their first serious test against Dublin in Croker, they obviously benefitted from having Corofin and u-21 players having played big games there the last few years. They are now sitting ducks for Mayo in Connaught as there will be hype about them, and Mayo will bring alot more to this game than the last two years. That said Galway will have come on so it should be some battle.


#763

The move and point (Lowndes) that clinched the game after a spell of Galway attack was repelled by feverish, hungry defending was the highlight of the game for me. The move that led to Rock’s goal attempt was brilliant. And a highlight (apart from multiple things he does) was also the sight of Jonny Cooper in a frenzy trying to get the ball after a Galway foul, throwing his own player out of the way after the Galway player, mad yoke, I love it.


#764

First half was very scrappy. Dublin were excellent in the second half both with the ball and defensively.

You can’t ignore the stuff that was going on off the ball. It did impact the game in first half. Dublin upped the tempo in the second half and made it much harder for Galway to act the maggot. Galway ran out of legs also.

We’ve done this in a lot of games. Slowish first half and then really lift it in3rd quarter. All in all was very good game for Dublin


#765

Not sure the Aussies are convinced it works fine, bottomline is people will always complain about refs, first of all because a lot of decisions come down to interpretation and secondly they are bound to make mistakes and finally a lot of the people that complain don’t know the actual rules…
Veteran football writer, The Australian’s Ray Gatt has not minced his words on the matter.

“The standard of the A-League refereeing over the past five, six, eight years has been pretty ordinary to say the least,” Gatt told The Daily Football Show podcast. “Certainly something has to be done.”


#766

People not knowing the rules is a major part of it. The black card thing is a typical example of that, where it seems the majority of people at games don’t have a clue of the transgressions it is given for.

People also automatically assume that a ref is wrong if they haven’t seen the foul. But the ref is much closer and he can see the arm tug or the jersey tug that someone on the sidelines can’t.

There are a lot of flaws around off the ball stuff, but I think for on the ball play the ref is correct a lot more then people think he is.