Goalkeeper Training


#1

Just thought i would get a bit of info from some of you fellow Ressers on goalkeeping training within your clubs.Mainly do your goalkeepers train separately to them rest of the team or do they take part in all the drills with team mates like shooting, tackling etc?

If they do train separately at what age are the taken away from the main group?

Cheers


#2

Goalkeepers need to do there own specific work away from the group for a period of the session. For me they do the warm up and opening drills getting the eye in. From that point the 2 keepers if there is 2, should break away with 1 of the coaches and work on aspects of the game keepers need to excel in. After about 20 minutes, or longer if needed, they rejoin the main group.

As an aside I think the same should apply for defenders and forwards, break away in their groups and drills specific to that role.

Finally going back to your second question, personally I’d start it at 14 before thatI’m not sure a team should have a set goalkeeper, all players should play all positions until then in my opinion. But from 14 on a defined keeper should be chosen and drilled correctly in the position.


#3

Would have the goalkeeper train with the outfield players for skill work, such as focus on soloing, hand passing foot passing etc. but when point shooting drills are on I would then have them focus on their own specific drills. I also had them do different warm up once the gentle jog etc. was complete. I would also focus on this from under 12 up.


#4

I believed in player specific training after our session was over. For example, forwards practiced shooting/jinking etc and frees for the free taker, and 'keeper training for 'keepers etc. Just an additional 15 mins at the end of the session, but you need sufficient coaches to run this. I found it worked well.


#5

Reading this with interest lads, can I ask if you are coaching age groups 12 to 14, how often to you have the sessions?


#6

Not sure what it is like for others but with most of the lads I had training playing Rugby, Soccer and Basketball I would only get 1 training session per week in except when on a run with U15 or 16’s in latter stages of the league or championship when you would do a session focusing on tactics but no real physical work as they would be jacked.
But at each training session we would put a focus on specific training for goalie and the other positions once you go past U12.


#7

Not a coach myself, but lend a hand at training at a local club.
Same problem with kids having commitments to other sports.


#8

I would find that 20 mins a week on their own is enough to work on their footwork, Handling and diving techniques. I would place a huge emphasis on footwork and body position over diving saves with no purpose at all ages as the best keepers make the easiest saves due to their positional sense which comes from hours upon hours of work. When that is mastered you step up the diving especially on the keepers weak side which generally speaking is the side that he kicks with.
I try coach keepers from 10 onwards as the earlier you can get basics into them the easier it gets thereafter to develop them fully. Kids that want to learn are like sponges are can develop very quickly on basics. The hard part is getting them to be vocal as they are the last line and can see the whole field.
Finally you can involve all players in numerous drills that make backs defend their goal / forwards work space and overlaps and keeper in both organising his backs in addition to shot saving etc.