Coddle - how do you like yours?


#41

Yer not missing anything, I ve no culchie blood sullying my lineage and coddle is mank, don t let anyone else convince you. Boiled sausages ffs.


#42

Coddle for breakfast is a great cure for the morning after.


#43

Can ye post some recipes? Times, temperatures etc? Or ask your other halves to seeing as the reality is that none of ye really know how to boil an egg.


#44

The fact this arose from an ■■■■■■■■■■■■ tweet is satisfying to say the least. Fair play :smiley:


#45

Do they call them lardons on the Southside?


#46

It usually takes her about 3 hours to make it, if I keep the pressure on anyway. She doesn’t use receipes. Think she knows it all already…


#47

The little sausages? Hardly.


#48

Never tasted coddle in my life and was born and bred in Dublin :open_mouth:

Boiled sausages is what puts me off. The one with fried sausages looks tempting though


#49

Lardons Pancetta.


#50

This needs to happen. Coddle talk is consuming all threads at this point.


#51

Ever cook it in a pressure cooker?


#52

No, have thought about it in a slow cooker but not done it yet.


#53

No barley ?


#54

No sir!


#55

Serving pour deux

Six Superquin sossies
Four streaky rashers
Four regular rashers
4 medium sized schpuds
A fuckin’ truck load of onions
A wee bit of black pepper. No salt. There is enough salt in all the rashers
1 1/2 pints of water

Boil ta fcuk for about 10 mins. Then let simmer for about 20/30 more.
Mix in a little corn flour to thicken, about 5 mins before serving.
Cooking time in our house is spud specific. If they are big un’s chop them in two. No smaller, or they just turn to mush & you don’t really want that, unless you are 90 and you have no teeth.

The onions will turn to mush & that’s fine, as they give the sauce the flavour. Add in another onion half way through cooking, if you want some undissolved onion to eat.

Making it can be a bit trial and error, as getting the sauce consistency right can be tricky. Too much corn flour & it ends up like wall paper paste. Too little & its watery. So don’t be put off, if it takes you a couple of attempts to get it tickety-boo.

It’s important to put in a mixture of rashers too. You need the streaky, very fatty rashers, as the fat melting into the goo is important for flavour. But all you’ll be left with at the end of the boiling process, is a rubbery rind, with no mate left on. So if you like a recognisable rasher in yer coddle, put in a few “good” rashers too, as they can survive all the boiling.

If thoughts of carrots, celery, lentils or barley cross your mind, go have a quick lie down. You’ll be grand soon.

That’s about it really. Don’t be put off by appearances. Yes, the boiled sossies look a bit like the willy of a syphilitic 95 year old, who just swam the Atlantic, but dahling…it tastes DIVINE !!!


#56

Fair play @ProudDub wunderbar!


#57

Going to give that recipe a lash at the weekend.
Cook it Saturday night & then have it on Sunday after Dunloy.


#58

The Granny always made coddle as follows: Sausages (non-fried), streaky Bacon, thick cut Bacon, whole onions (allowed to break up naturally), Spuds, Carrots, Tripe and Milk…Boil the shite out of it and then served with either Batch Bread or Turnover…


#59

Keep it simple is my motto. A coddle can be easy to fcuk up, if you put too much crap in it, that it doesn’t really need. It’s a fairly simple, straightforward dish. There is A LOT of flavour from the rashers & onions in particular. It doesn’t need any more imo. But if you decide it needs jazzing up, then that is between you and The Coddle Gods. No judgment here ! :wink:


#60

Lots of black pepper and salt for seasoning is a must, I reckon.