Clump


#5658

If it’s Don Jr or Eric you can be sure a pardon will be quickly behind it


#5659

At a federal level yes. Do local investigations cover either of them?


#5660


#5661

I’d bet the house they’re under investigation by NY State. Be fun to see how Dumb and Dumber do in Rikers


#5662

Very true. I wonder which of Trump’s ‘kids’ are actually his?


#5663

Well…

I mean you can’t deny there are similarities…


#5664

Like James Hewitt and Harry!


#5665

Not suspicious at all. Manchurian candidate anyone?


#5666

#5667

At least he would get his just deserts.


#5668

#5669

#5670

:fire::fire::fire::fire::fire:


#5671


#5672

Problem with a lot of memes is that they’re Selective with the facts.


#5673

So tell us?


#5674

Place is gone to hell alright. I blame Trump.


#5676

Leaves out all detail, as all memes do:

“ Webb had committed suicide.[69] When asked by local reporters about the possibility of two gunshots being a suicide, Lyons replied: “It’s unusual in a suicide case to have two shots, but it has been done in the past, and it is in fact a distinct possibility.” News coverage noted that there were widespread rumors on the Internet at the time that Webb had been killed as retribution for his “Dark Alliance” series,”

“ … but Webb’s ex-wife Susan Bell told reporters that she believed Webb had committed suicide.[69] “The way he was acting it would be hard for me to believe it was anything but suicide,” she said. According to Bell, Webb had been unhappy for some time over his inability to get a job at another major newspaper. He had sold his house the week before his death because he was unable to afford the mortgage.[69]

also on the reporting itself

Webb’s reporting in “Dark Alliance” remains controversial. Many writers discussing the series point to errors in it. The claim that the drug ring of Meneses-Blandón-Ross sparked the “crack explosion” has been perhaps the most criticized part of the series. Nick Schou, a journalist who wrote a 2006 biography of Webb, has claimed that this was the most important error in the series. Writing on the Los Angeles Times opinion page, Schou said, “Webb asserted, improbably, that the Blandón-Meneses-Ross drug ring opened ‘the first pipeline between Colombia’s cocaine cartels and the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles,’ helping to ‘spark a crack explosion in urban America.’ The story offered no evidence to support such sweeping conclusions, a fatal error that would ultimately destroy Webb, if not his editors.”[76]

While finding this part of the series unsupported, Schou said that some of the series’ claims on CIA involvement are supported, writing that “The CIA conducted an internal investigation that acknowledged in March 1998 that the agency had covered up Contra drug trafficking for more than a decade.” According to Schou, the investigation “confirmed key chunks of Webb’s allegations.” In a later article in the LA Weekly , Schou wrote that Webb was “vindicated by a 1998 CIA Inspector General report, which revealed that for more than a decade the agency had covered up a business relationship it had with Nicaraguan drug dealers like Blandón.”[77]

Writing after Webb’s death in 2005, The Nation magazine’s former Washington Editor David Corn said that Webb “was on to something but botched part of how he handled it.” According to Corn, Webb “was wrong on some important details, but he was, in a way, closer to the truth than many of his establishment media critics who neglected the story of the real CIA-contra-cocaine connection.” Like Schou, Corn cites the inspector general’s report, which he says “acknowledged that the CIA had indeed worked with suspected drugrunners while supporting the contras.”[78]

Not all writers agree that the Inspector-General’s report supported the series’ claims. Jeff Leen, assistant managing editor at The Washington Post for investigative reporting, wrote in a 2014 opinion page article that “the report found no CIA relationship with the drug ring Webb had written about.” Leen, who covered the cocaine trade for the Miami Herald in the 1980s, rejects the claim that “because the report uncovered an agency mind-set of indifference to drug-smuggling allegations”, it vindicated Webb’s reporting.[79]

Peter Kornbluh, a researcher at George Washington University’s National Security Archives, also does not agree that the report vindicated the series. Noting that most of the activities discussed in the report had nothing to do with the people Webb reported on, Kornbluh told Schou, “I can’t say it’s a vindication. It was good that his story forced those reports to come out, but part of what made that happen was based on misleading information.”[80]

Certainly not as cut & dry as the meme suggests but then memes are powerful misinformation tools.


#5677

And yes I realize Wikipedia is not exactly a cast iron case! :joy:


#5678

That lunatic Loomer at it again

Getting arrested for Trespass and attempted burglary to own the Libs whilst also proving walls don’t work