Brexit


#2897

A link to an opinion based on talking to people and reading and hearing multiple opinions about German history, politics, economics, and culture for the last 35 years or so? No.
I lived in Germany for two years. I have gone there once or twice a year for most of the last 20 years. I was there in September this year. I have contact with people there on a regular basis. I’ll trust my opinion based on my own experience before any ‘links’ to supposedly informed records or reports, especially some of the ones posted on social media, thanks.


#2898

I wasn’t suggesting a link to social media. There are other verifiable sources of information. I am just wondering why you think Germany has long prepared for ‘that threat’ when the evidence suggests that one million migrants is a bridge too far for many, in Germany, as evidenced by the rise of the right (AFD) and the consequent change in the emphasis and policies of more mainstream parties. Just a question!


#2899

For what it’s worth, in terms of demographics, Europe is not reproducing itself and is ageing. That is the real reason behind the clamour for support for migration. Totally based on economics. Not as kind, loving and fluffy as some might think!!


#2900

It’s a long and complex story. Indeed the current refugee/asylum(not migrant) issue there is obviously a big source of struggle and disagreement etc, not entirely unlike the post-Yugoslav one 20 years ago, though as well as the different source and culture, it’s in a different climate and dynamic, political and otherwise.
In a nutshell post WWII the redevelopment of Germany set in place various aspects of politics, education, and economics that would help it become a nation that would not be so vulnerable to mass internal movements of an extreme nature.
This ultimately worked very well so far, and included relative successes such as the absorption of the old GDR post 1990, and the Yugo war and refugee crisis.
For me their current situation is very much dominated by three things, with the added issue of the Syrian refugees:
1.They are the dominant force in Europe.
2.Europe is under alot of stress which on the grander scale is IMO simply a product of global economics and power shifts, and that in itself stems from the major Euro nations relative decline in ability to expand or maintain their competitiveness. Ageing population is one large part of it but that itself is a product of forces and factors that stem from societal and cultural cycles that are undergoing a yuuuuge process of shifting.
3. A large part of the redevelopment of Germany was based on American influence, inbuilt in militaristic and economic structures at least. As America’s global power and relationships have shifted and are under great threat, accordingly Germany (and the other Euro nations it is the leader for) treads an interesting line in balancing for example the aims of an aspired and largely successful social democratic system against an increasingly antagonistic and, as we now know, increasingly unstable American ultra capitalist militaristic system?

How much is Germany and Europe willing to oppose their major global ally, trading partner, benefactor, ‘protector’, and controlling element? How much do the forces and influences of this struggle, and the issues of unemployment, ageing pop, standards of living, social unrest, and other recently increasing challenges for those and other reasons, change and destabilise Germany and other Euro nations, and how do they respond?

Fooked if I know that!


#2901

PS. The ‘British Question’ is of course a yuuuuge source of both cause and effect of the current struggle for ‘Europe’ and especially Germany as the leader.
Like it or lump it, UK more onside than off with Europe means a much stronger Europe in terms of dealing with the global struggles etc. The ‘open relationship’ arrangement though appears currently much worse than a clean break.
Next UK elections will tell us more than anything else about that I feel. Impossible to know what will emerge but when we lift our heads out of the local play-pen we see that a more united Europe can balance and defuse the extremes of current America and ultrapowerful China.
But even a United Europe can’t compete with the developing powers, even a coalition of Europe and America can’t. I suppose the real question is how America and Europe handle major economic and ultimately social decline. So far America is bottom of that class. It will go to war to try to keep what it has or keep as much as possible.
Will Europe resist getting involved? Will the war simply trample over Europe in all in anyways?
What will the joker in the pack do?(Russia)


#2902

Europe at this stage needs to forge allegiances separate from the U.S. and that’s for starters.


#2903

Already well underway. Ireland has done well in that regard but then left in a weak and vulnerable position post 2008. Clawing back now but having had alot of economic dependence and influence in and from America and the UK has left us very vulnerable. UK bought up alot of Irish assets etc post 2008. China probably in the process of acquiring those as we speak. Russia probably have a good lot too.


#2904

If the petrodollar ever shifts, that will be that!


#2905

It makes them more competitive, thousands of jobs that could move here from the UK in finacial services do note come becouse of this difference. Add in the USC and we are totally uncompetitive. UK based people, many Irish, refuse to move over this and companies have delayed and halted a lot of relocations.

Edit: so I see why this is clever for the Tories.


#2906

Britain wanting their cake and eating it part 157389

Well done Norway


#2907

So countries in the WTO playing hardball as well, as predicted as well. Meanwhile yerman hannon has outlined his plans for american private companies to run hospitals in the UK. Somehow i dont think 17million people voted for that. The thing is, for all it’s faults, the EU has more benefits then allowing the tories apply the free market to everything.


#2908

They have let in over 1 million refugees/immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa. It is why Merkel’s party’s core vote has been withering away.


#2909

That’s it in a nutshell.


#2910

#2911

Great news, there will be some interesting discussion a head with the CBOI.


#2912

only 250 billion?


#2913

And this is where they’re going to. Was curious as to what was above The Ivy


#2914

As if things weren’t bad enough, the Tories won’t even get a taste of their own medicine …


#2915

Would’ve said it certainly contributed in a large way but that their decline was underway in any case, or at the same time. They’ve been in power quite a long while. Some other stuff going on too, such as the Europe crisis, German inflation, anti-American feeling.


#2916

:tada::tada::tada::tada::tada: